SADDER BUT WISER: WORKING WITH THE DEPRESSIVE PERSONALITY

COMING SOON- This seminar will explore the introjective defensive style of the depressive personality from a broadly psychodynamic perspective, and discussed constructive ways of approaching the depressive personality in therapy.  The depressive is emotionally sensitive, self-critical, fearful of rejection, and often carries around an inordinate amount of inappropriate guilt and unmourned losses.  Healthy depressives often make up for their own perceived failures by trying to heal others and doing good deeds; more disturbed depressives may descend into self-hatred, mood disorder, and even psychotic features.

 

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Psychologists, MFTs, LCSWs, LEPs, LPCCs

bennett2Matthew Bennett Psy.D.
Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Psychotherapist, Professor at Pacifica Graduate Institute.


WHEN: 
DATE: TO BE ANNOUNCED
TIME: TBD
# of CE CREDITS: 3

WHERE:
Montecito Library
1469 East Valley Road
Montecito, CA 93108

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 ADDITIONAL COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The depressive personality has been left out of DSM nomenclature, with the result that many therapists are unfamiliar with this personality style and its interpersonal dynamics. The depressive style compares a warm, relational interpersonal style with fear of loneliness and abandonment, and tends to idealize others while devaluing the self. Depressive personalities have trouble getting angry and commonly internalize their own natural aggression out of fears of being bad people. This seminar explored ways of understanding and navigating the depressive perspective from a broadly psychodynamic perspective.

The depressive personality organization has been described in the psychoanalytic literature and is common among psychotherapists and others who gravitate into healing professions, although the diagnosis was lost in the historical shifts of the DSM. The personality organization involves introjective defenses against fears of object-loss and a pervasive, irrational sense of guilt. This seminar explored theoretical, diagnostic, and treatment issues surrounding the depressive personality organization, the history of the diagnosis, and how to differentiate depressive personality from dysphoric or depressive mood disorders. The discussion examined the essential features of the depressive personality organization at several levels: archetypal, object relations, self-psychology, and behavioral as well as cultural considerations. The seminar also explored some of the more important “rules of the road” in treating depressives in therapy, including how to navigate the depressive tendency to please the therapists and other risks associated with the “retreat into health.”